Grass-fed, grass-finished bison

 Bison is a healthy red meat that is a high quality protein filled with iron, zinc, selenium, phosphorous, and the B-complex vitamins.

When you choose grass-fed bison, you are getting more nutritional benefits. Meat from pasture raised bison has less overall fat and cholesterol, fewer calories and fewer omega-6 fatty acids than grain-fed bison. The meat has more CLA (conjugated linoleic acid), beta-carotene, Vitamin E and omega-3’s than grain fed bison.  

Is grass-fed meat tender? Many people assume that the amount of marbling in bison or beef determines it tenderness. Marbling only accounts for 10% of the variability of meat tenderness, while genetics account for at least 30%. The rest of the variability is due to location of the cut (loin or shoulder), the age and sex of the animal, and the stress level of the animal prior to slaughter. Tenderness can also be increased by dry-aging the carcass. In dry-aging, the whole carcass is held at a temperature just above freezing for one week or more. At High Point Bison we take great care to maximize these tenderness factors to provide a consistently flavorful, tender, and healthy product.

 

The American Heart Association recommends bison as a part of a heart healthy diet and Reader’s Digest suggests that it is one of the top 5 foods that women should eat because it is high in iron and low in calories and fat.

So what makes our grass-fed bison taste so good? Our bison are raised on native prairie pastures without antibiotics, hormones, or steroids. The grasses gives the meat a sweet rich flavor. The meat is tasty, tender, and healthy!

 

Grass-fed, grass-finished beef

 

Beef is a high quality protein filled with iron, zinc, selenium, phosphorous, and B-complex vitamins.

When you choose grass-fed beef, you are getting additional health benefits not found in grain-finished beef. Grass-fed beef has less overall fat and fewer calories. Grass-fed meats are higher in omega-3 fatty acids, CLA, Vitamin E, and beta-carotene. The meat also has a healthier ratio of omega-6 to omega 3 fatty acids than traditional grain fed meats. The higher amounts of beta-carotene is what gives grass-fed beef fat its creamy light yellow color.   

Is grass-fed meat tender? Many people assume that the amount of marbling in beef or bison determines it tenderness. Marbling only accounts for 10% of the variability of meat tenderness, while genetics account for at least 30%. The rest of the variability is due to location of the cut (loin or shoulder), the age and sex of the animal, and the stress level of the animal prior to slaughter. Tenderness can also be increased by dry-aging the carcass. In dry-aging, the whole carcass is held at a temperature just above freezing for one week or more. At High Point Beef we take great care to maximize these tenderness factors to provide a consistently flavorful, tender, and healthy product.